Encapsulated

I’ve committed to not buying any clothing for this year. So far, I haven’t seen anything I want to buy. I’ve been steering clear of my favourite thrift stores and websites, and even survived a recent trip to Uniqlo without a twinge. I don’t need anything, and I’m trying to streamline the healthy amount of stuff I already own.

I’m no stranger to the concept of a capsule wardrobe. I’ve been on that train for a while. I frequently rotate pieces in my closet both for the sake of variety, and to avoid the Paradox of Choice. You may think those two reasons seem contradictory. Let me explain.

My closet is a decent size. It could hold all of my clothing at once. That doesn’t mean it should.

Many people rotate clothing twice a year, swapping out shorts and flip flops for sweaters and boots when it gets cold, and doing the reverse when it warms up again. This is good. This is normal.

I tend to rotate my closet every 4-8 weeks.

The place I live has four defined seasons, and within those seasons, temperature and precipitation can swing drastically from one day to the next. This fall, I went from bare legs to fleece tights within about a day-and-a-half. What I wore in September wouldn’t work now, and October’s wardrobe may not make it to Christmas.

Every month or two, I swap out what no longer works for something else, keeping a consistent level of about 30 items in my closet at any given time. Some things never leave. It keeps me from getting bored with my choices, and it helps me weed out the stuff I really don’t like wearing, which goes on the Give Away Pile.

Sometimes I get into the habit of making capsules out of my capsules, like grouping five or six complimentary separates and only wearing those items for the whole work week. When I do this, it saves me immeasurable time in the mornings.

Fewer options = fewer decisions = more time to pack a lunch.

I never fully pack away my off-season clothing. I like to have everything stored out of sight but not reach. This makes frequent reshuffling quicker, and also allows me to easily access things I might need for traveling to different climates. I have capsules I keep only for travel, too.

(I realize this may be excessive. It’s a key part of my packing process.)

If you’ve never tried putting together a capsule wardrobe, I refer you to this great resource.

Give it a try. And tell me all about it. I love this stuff.

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One thought on “Encapsulated

  1. This is definitely something that interests me. Both my husband and I are definite clothes horses, though admittedly, a great deal of my clothing comes from thrift shopping or new things nabbed on clearance. I do know that I have WAY more things than I actually need. For example, who needs EIGHT different pairs of pajama bottoms?

    Other than infants, NO ONE, that’s who.

    I tend to swap up my clothes twice a year, spring and fall, but what you say makes sense…because honestly, most of my clothes shopping is done out of boredom with what I already own, not out of an actual NEED.

    This may be something I need to look into further.

    Liked by 1 person

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